Are Maine Coons High Maintenance?


I’ve owned cats my whole life and for the last 15 years have lived with two beautiful Maine Coons. They are large cats and many people assume this means caring for one is time-consuming. Hopefully, this article will reassure you that Maine Coons are no more difficult to look after than any other cats.

Are Maine Coons high maintenance? Though larger than the average cat, Maine Coons are by no means high maintenance or hard work. You do not need to put in a lot of extra effort to keep a Maine Coon happy and you won’t find one overly demanding of your attention.

Are Maine Coons High Maintenance?Tabby Maine Coon

To put it simply, Maine Coons need the same level of care as all cats. A little extra grooming might be required, a larger cat carrier and bigger litter box, and perhaps a little more food. Overall, they are fabulous cats to live with.

That said, a Maine Coon can be high maintenance if you make it that way. You can treat your Maine Coon like a little prince or princess if you choose to.

What Maine Coons Need

Being large cats, Maine Coons need certain things to be little bigger than the norm.

Cat carrier

You’ll need a larger than average cat carrier for safe trips to the vets. We use one that allows enough room for a Maine Coon to stand up enough to turn round. Basically, get the largest one you can manage to carry once your Maine Coon is inside – bearing in mind it could weigh around 18 lbs when fully grown.

Litter box

The best litter box for a Maine Coon is large with relatively high sides. Though you might think an enclosed box is better, it’s not ideal as they have large fluffy tails that need to be held out of the way.

Naturally cats like a quick escape route from a tray due to natural instincts to get away from their toilet site before a predator picks up their scent. Adding a lid impedes this instinctual habit.

The Petmate Giant litter box is absolutely the best for an adult Maine Coon.

Good quality food

This is not a high maintenance feature – it’s necessary for good health. Feed your Maine Coon a diet that’s predominantly protein. Bear in mind, Maine Coons do not need to eat a great deal more than any other cats.

A cat weighing 10 lbs needs approximately 250 calories per day and a cat of 18 lbs needs about 450 calories. Check the calories in any food you serve and remember, dry food is far more calorie-dense than wet. Avoid the temptation to constantly top up a Maine Coon’s food dish, especially if it’s an indoor cat.

Unless you are certain that it is very clean, free of bacteria and parasites, its is best to avoid a raw food diet. This can pose a risk for your cat and you.

Are Maine Coons High Maintenance? Maine Coon eating

Annual health checks

As well as a full set of vaccinations in its first year of life, a Maine Coon (like all cats) should have an annual health checks and booster vaccinations to keep it healthy.

It’s a good idea to invest in pet insurance to cover vets bills incurred should your cat suffer an accident or illness.

Grooming

Most cats need grooming, especially those with long hair. Start when your cat is a kitten so it gets used to the feel of a brush. If you groom a Maine Coon every other day, it won ‘t take too much time and will prevent ts fur from becoming matted.

We use the Hertzko Self Cleaning slicker brush because it gently removes loose fur in the undercoat, removes tangles and prevents mats from developing.

Playtime

Most Maine Coons are kept indoors so it is essential that they get plenty of exercise through play. Buy a variety of toys and make sure you play with your Maine Coon a couple of times a day at least for 15 minutes each time. A Maine Coon is never too old to play – this breed is always a kitten at heart.

Remember this is not a Maine Coon being high maintenance because play is essential for any cat.

Are Maine Coons High Maintenance? Kitten playing

How to make a Maine Coon more high maintenance

You can make your Maine Coon seem high maintenance in many ways. Here are just a few.

Special diets

Rather than feeding you cat with prepared cat food, you can choose to make your own. You will need to ensure you get the balance of protein and essential nutrients right to ensure your cat’s health is not compromised.

Making your own cat food is absolutely fine, but remember the cat didn’t ask you to do spend your time doing it!

Fountains

Most cats will drink out of a dish of water, though you might not witness them doing it often. Some Maine Coons like to drink from a running source of water.

If you don’t fancy having your cat on your counter drinking from the kitchen faucet, you could treat it to a pet drinking fountain. Our cats love the Petsafe Drinkwell. We chose it because it offers a bowl of water as well as running filtered water.

Bathing

Many people assume Maine Coons need to be bathed regularly but this is not the case. If you choose to bathe yours, you may find your cat does not enjoy it which will make the whole experience stressful for both of you.

Only bathe a Maine Coon if absolutely necessary and ensure you use a suitable cat shampoo.

Are Maine Coons High Maintenance? Cat in shower
Wet cat in the bath. Funny cat. Maine Coon

Lion cut

Some people think a lion cut is a cute thing to give a Maine Coon. If you think hot weather necessitates such a drastic shave please be aware that your Maine Coons long coat is excellent at helping it to regulate its body temperature.

See all there is to know about the Maine Coon Lion cut before you commit to shaving your cat.

Maine Coon claw maintenance

Like all cats, Maine Coons claw at all sorts of things. Even if you provide a scratching post, your cat is likely to scratch other things in your house. You may also get an accidental scratch from time-to-time. These are never reasons to declaw a cat.

You can clip the sharp tips from a Maine Coons claws to help limit the damage – it’s best to let a professional do this for you.

Training

Maine Coon’s are often compared to dogs and some people spend a considerable amount of time trying to train theirs like one. These cats are very intelligent and some people have some luck getting them to obey certain commands.

I wouldn’t hold high hopes of having a lot of success training one.

Indoor life

An indoor Maine Coon needs plenty of space to exercise. They love to climb and some people go to a lot of trouble installing amazing climbing shelves, walkways and platforms. This may make Maine Coons seem high-maintenance but really it is just a fantastic thing to do to keep life interesting for any indoor cat.

Cat hotels

When you go on holiday you may get a cat sitter to come to your house to care for your Maine Coon. If you don’t have anyone to do this for you and don’t fancy sending your cat to a cattery you can book it into a cat hotel. Now this can be classed as high-maintenance. It will certainly be high-priced!

Posh Beds

Cats prefer to sit on your best seats and sleep on your bed, but many people like to spoil their Maine Coon by buying it a special bed (or two). My favorite is this cave bed. Don’t be upset if you buy your cat umpteen posh beds and it doesn’t sleep in any of them – this is quite normal!

 Are Maine Coons High Maintenance? Cats in bed

Large enclosures

In order to give your Maine Coon a safe outside life, you could enclose your whole garden with high fences and a mesh roof. This way, it can enjoy the outside world and not wander off or be in any danger from predators.

This could definitely be classed as high-maintenance but a Maine Coon is worth it!

Are Maine Coons High Maintenance? – Conclusion

If you look after your Maine Coon properly and give it a lovely life, this should not be considered high-maintenance and don’t let anyone tell you otherwise. All cats deserve to be well cared for.

If you really want to spoil it, here are 22 products your Maine Coon must have!

Jane

I'm Jane Pettitt, co-owner of Pets Knowledge Base with my husband, Matt. I have a grand total of 50 years’ experience as a pet owner. It all started with a guinea pig called Percy when I was 5 years old and since then I’ve lived with two more guinea pigs, a hamster, mice, a rabbit, a tortoise, a dog and 11 cats. I’ve learned so much about pet care during this time and many of my articles are based on my personal experiences and those of my family and friends .

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